Select Page
What is my first step?
Where can I go for help?
Does an MRI or CT Scan really show dementia?
This is progressing fast and we are worried about her being alone.
I thought her odd behaviors were just normal aging behavior and forgetfulness.
I need to get my father to the doctor for a cognitive assessment and he won’t go.

I Forgive You Forget A Caregiver's Resource

Community

Q’s & A’s

We have unexpectedly found ourselves as a caregivers.  Now what?  

First, know there are over 75 different forms of dementia.  It is a moving target with varied symptoms, therefore, no two forms of dementia are alike.  

Your first steps can be calling your local Alzheimer’s Association for an introductory class, support group session, or talking to their counselors on hand.  You will be able to express your particular, subjective concerns by giving examples of your experiences.  In support group, you will also hear other stories and solutions that are relevant to your own experiences.  

Another first step can be making an appointment with your loved one’s Neurologist.  Yes, an MRI or CT Scan can indicate brain atrophy or plaque.  Your Neurologist can also give your loved one a standard cognitive test.   

Our website is open 24/7/365.  Our FB Private Chat Room is a source of information in the form of Q’s & A’s from our IFYF community.  We all  contribute suggestions and problem solving in deference to the many forms of dementia and their many forms of symptoms.  And we offer it in a safe, non-judgmental environment.

Search by any terminology using the search bar below and have the information highlighted within seconds. Sometimes all we need is suggestion to find a way out of the maze and move forward. 

*NOTE:  The “Dear Vic” entries below are only a sample to demonstrate how this forum works. The search bar will only search terms found within these sample entries. For full access to “Dear Vic,” please login or subscribe as a lifetime member.

Search within these sample entries:

I Forgive You Forget A Caregiver's Resource

Community Q’s & A’s

We have unexpectedly found ourselves as caregivers.  Now what?  The stone walls we slam into every day seem disturbingly part of a larger maze, one that makes us stop, turn around, go back, and try another way.  

There are over 75 different forms of dementia, it is a moving target with varied symptoms, therefore, no two forms of dementia are alike.  Our Chat Room for Q’s & A’s is a community effort where we all contribute our own suggestions and problem solving in deference to the many forms of dementia.

Search by any terminology using the search bar below and have the information highlighted within seconds. Sometimes all we need is suggestion to find a way out of the maze and move forward.

*NOTE:  The “Dear Vic” entries below are only a sample to demonstrate how this forum works. The search bar will only search terms found within these sample entries. For full access to “Dear Vic,” please login or subscribe as a lifetime member.

Search within these sample entries:

“When you feel like quitting, think about why you started,”

-Winston Churchill

Question 1

Dear Vic:  I think my aunt’s medications are interacting negatively, causing severe depression.  Her insurance changed because of the new year and I need to find a new primary physician – now, immediately.

I called a few doctors from a list given to me by one of these doctors, but all of them were either not taking new patients, or did not take my aunt’s insurance, or both. I was on the phone for over an hour striking out. Suggestions?

A:  Call your Aunt’s Insurance Company directly.  Get THEIR current list of physicians taking new patients NOW.  Explain to both the insurance company and the doctor’s office the severity and critical circumstance of your Aunt’s depression to get in as soon as possible.

Be patient with the process and yourself.  It took me multiple tries over many months to get the right physicians or help for Mom, but my circumstances were not as dire as yours right now.  

I also found I needed to be my mother’s power of attorney to conduct 97% of matters on her behalf.  Get a POA and keep it handy on your desk, ready to fax or mail a copy at a moment’s notice. Be firm, but calm with the company or doctor’s office you are calling. People seem to respond well to determined urgency, i.e., “I am my mother’s power of attorney and I need your help.” 

Question 2

Dear Vic:  I’ve been awake all night, my mind wouldn’t shut off so I wound up on the internet.  I ran across a talk with Teepa Snow and Leeza Gibbons on YouTube.  My mom has not been officially diagnosed, but WOW, when I saw this video EVERYTHING NOW MAKES SENSE!! Mom’s odd behaviors were described, and so were the reasons I am exhausted.  I thought her odd behaviors were just normal aging behavior and forgetfulness.

What other videos are out there that I can watch that you recommend or like?

A: Suggestion from Subscriber: Ha!  Coincidentally two weeks ago in Group, our Group Leader, had us watch Part I, with Leeza Gibbons and Teepa Snow, the YouTube videos are called “Alzheimer’s and Dementia: Care for the Caregiver.”  

From Vic:  I immediately added it to our suggestions in the “Resource” page under “Documentaries or YouTube Interviews, Etc.” Take a peak in the Resource section and hopefully you’ll find other things to watch that will help and be meaningful to you.

I Forgive You Forget A Caregiver's Resource

Please consult a professional or your doctor if you or your loved one are experiencing an emergency.